Recess: No or Go

Recess%3A+No+or+Go

Lily Anderson, Writer

 

It’s the question asked in every school, “Should we have recess?” Many times, it depends on age, elementary school, middle or high school. Here in Fort Thomas, it used to be that elementary and middle schoolers got recess, but the high schoolers got none. This year though, recess was officially stripped from the schedule in the middle school.  

Some people believe recess is a distraction, some think it helps; what really matters though is how the school is run and research and data. Maybe the school has no space, maybe the school day isn’t long enough, maybe the schedule has a different way of doing things that aren’t recess yet give the same benefits. Some states have policies that require the school to allow kids to run free and enjoy recess but there are only eight states that do partake in enforcing the policy.  

First question is if recess should even happen; well, everyone knows that it allows physical activity and gets the kids active and healthy, it gives kids a break from schoolwork, and it helps kids socialize. Sometimes though, people are skeptical of how good it really is because of the fear that the kids would be losing learning time. Though looking at the article “Turns Out Monkey Bars and Kickball Might be Good for the Brain” on NPR it states, “Wells and fellow first-grade teacher Donna McBride have six decades of teaching between them and say this year feels different. They were nervous about fitting in all the extra recess and covering the basics, but Wells says that halfway through the school year, her kids are way ahead of schedule.”  That statement shows that when the school had extra recesses that the kids started learning even faster than anticipated.  

Another question is “what do the kids think?” Eli Hamm, sixth grader, said that we should have recess because, “It helps kids get energy out.” He also said it would make it so kids could focus better and not fidget around during class. He also believes that it is good for getting active and misses having it every day. Colton Bailey and Grayson Schwalbach, both eighth graders, think the same about having recess. They both say yes to recess and agree that it’s good for stretching the legs out and getting all the energy out. And they both miss playing with friends and playing sports during recess.  

Even teachers prefer recess, Susan Anderson, seventh grade teacher, says, “There are many positives and negatives, and kids this age need exercise and fresh air to rejuvenate themselves throughout the day.” Mrs. Anderson even misses recess; she says that she misses seeing the kids coming back from recess refreshed and happy. 

With their opinions it’s plain and clear that kids and teachers want recess. So why not let the kids get some energy out and have fun, recess just seems like a go.